Connect with us

News

Jeremy Hunt hinted at the end of pay restraint for NHS Staff

Sarah J

Published

on

Jeremy Hunt has hinted at the end of pay restraint during a conference for NHS leaders in Liverpool today.

Subscribe to the NursingNotes 'Handover' - our weekly nursing newsletter.

Following his reappointment, Jeremy Hunt, has hinted at the end of pay restraint for healthcare staff. During a conference with NHS Leaders in Liverpool today he has promised to discuss the issue further with the chancellor.

He is due to meet with RCN chief executive and General Secretary Janet Davies in the coming weeks to discuss the issue further.

NHS Staff have been subjected to an on-going 1% pay cap following recommendations from the NHS Pay Review Body.

During the this speech he said; “I’ve said many times, I have a great deal of sympathy for the case that nurses amongst others have made on the issue of pay”.

“I think they do an absolutely brilliant job, they work very hard and need to factor in that there is an enormous amount of good will and time given free of charge because people care about their jobs – and see it not as a job but as a vocation”.

“We have our budget that we have to live within, but public sector pay is a matter for the chancellor, because it is policy that is set across the whole of government”.

“But I have had a very constructive letter from Janet Davies, head of the RCN, since I came back into office and will be meeting with her. And I will make sure our conversation is reflected back to the chancellor before he makes that decision”.

Finally, he added that he had noted an “enormous amount of goodwill” among staff who worked extra hours for no extra money.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Ella murphy

    15th June 2017 at 8:35 pm

    Goodwill has nothing to do with it,we as nurses have to complete paperwork during our shift,due to understaffing,high demands,I’ll people etc, we cannot fulfill this during normal shift hours and HAVE to stay behind to update paperwork..it’s very patronising from mr hunt and co to make comments like this!

Leave a Reply

News

NMC says regulation for nursing associates moves a step closer

James M

Published

on

The Nursing and Midwifery Council say regulation for nursing associates is getting closer and is expected by July 2018.

Subscribe to the NursingNotes 'Handover' - our weekly nursing newsletter.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has welcomed the Department of Health’s consultation on proposed changes to its legislation to enable the regulation of nursing associates.

The consultation follows the decision of the NMC’s Council to agree to regulate the new role, following a request from the Secretary of State for Health in January 2017.

Earlier this month the NMC released it’s draft standards of proficiency for Nursing Associates.

Jackie Smith, NMC Chief Executive and Registrar, said:

“This consultation is a vital step towards the NMC becoming the regulator of nursing associates.

“It’s always been our ambition to open the register to nursing associates in January 2019, when the first trainees qualify. But in order to do so, it’s critical that Government drives through the necessary changes to our legislation, to ensure that we’re able to protect the public from the moment the first qualified nursing associates begin to practise.”

The NMC expects the necessary changes to its legislation to come into force by July 2018. This will give the regulator six months until the first trainees qualify to complete the activities that need to be in place in order to open the register. This includes approving the NMC’s Rules and fees, approval of the final nursing associate standards and approval of nursing associates programme providers.

The consultation, Regulation of Nursing Associates in England, will run from 16 October to 26 December.

Continue Reading

News

Snacks sold in hospital shops should be under 250 calories

James M

Published

on

Image: Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

NHS England says snacks sold in hospitals canteens or shops should all be under 250 calories.

Subscribe to the NursingNotes 'Handover' - our weekly nursing newsletter.

NHS Hospitals will be given cash incentives to comply with a new ‘healthy eating’ campaign which will see a significant reduction in the number of sugary snacks, drinks and confectionary inside hospital shops and canteens.

The proposals will also extend to sandwiches, which must be under 400 calories, and all other pre-packed savoury meals, which should contain no more than 5g of saturated fat per 100g. Cans and bottles of sugary soft drinks are also covered by the ban, as well as sugary drinks made in cafes and canteens such as coffees with sugar syrup.

Hospital chiefs will need to ensure that 80% of items sold do not exceed the 250-calorie limit in order to receive the cash bonus.

It is unknown if this ban will extend to third-party organisations such as Costa Coffee and Starbucks.

Research has suggested that almost 700,000 of 1.3 million NHS employees are overweight or obese.

Last year, controversial expert hypnotist Steve Miller said healthcare professionals should lead the fight against the fat and wants overweight NHS staff to carry ‘I’m fat, but I’m losing it’ badges to inspire patients and colleagues.

Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, said:

“The NHS is now stepping up action to combat the super-size snack culture which is causing an epidemic of obesity, preventable diabetes, tooth decay, heart disease and cancer. “In place of calorie-laden, sugary snacks we want to make healthier food an easy option for hospital staff, patients and visitors.”

NHS England has pledged to boost the sale of healthy foods and end promotions of sugary and fatty or salty foods at checkouts.

Continue Reading

Trending