Connect with us

Secondary Care

London Network Looks for Students to Engage with Homeless Issues

Lou L

Published

on

London Network Looks for Students to Engage with Homeless Issues

The London Network for Nurses and Midwives (LNNM) was set up in 1999 to bring together specialist nurses and midwives to influence health policy in London.

There are roughly 40 core members, with around 15 nurses attending each meeting. There are over 200 hundred specialist practitioners on our pan London email distribution list, and links with many others outside London. The group meets bi-monthly and there is usually a presentation on an area of interest they also maintain a website, which is intended as a hub of information for members and other interested parties working in homelessness. Specialist nurses, midwives and allied healthcare practitioners working in all areas of homelessness are welcome. For example we have members who work with refugees and asylum seekers, homeless families, clients with TB, and sex workers.

The LNNM runs an annual conference, this year focusing on ‘Integrating Services for Inclusive Healthcare’. For the first time the network is looking to include students by recruiting enthusiastic individuals with interests in supporting homeless & vulnerable clients, and undertaking qualitative research to facilitate professional focus groups at the conference on Friday 12th May, 2017. This is a volunteer run event hosted by a dedicated and enthusiastic multidisciplinary team that’s really excited for students to become a part of it!

Students would gain free entry to the conference and a unique opportunity to participate in the research process in exchange for recording the discussions. This would be suitable for students at any stage of their studies and has always been highly valued by previous volunteers – it is a unique learning opportunity. The LNNM are hoping to recruit 30 to 40 student volunteers to work in pairs/threes facilitating & recording a group of approx. 30 professionals as they discuss issues around integration of services to provide inclusive healthcare.

The LNNM would also be delighted to hear from any final year or postgraduate students with an interest in undertaking thematic analysis of the data collected. This could provide material for a fantastic thesis or dissertation for anyone with an interest in the area and would enable us to disseminate the insights generated widely in order to enlighten service development, commissioning and policy making.

Anyone interested in volunteering can email: [email protected]

The LNNM look forward to having your support & involvement and sharing this exciting event with you! Find out more.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Join the discussion...

Leave a Reply

Secondary Care

NHS wants to send patients to France for treatment

Sarah J

Published

on

By

Calais Hospital

Calais Hospital has a partnered with NHS South Kent Clinical Commissioning Group to provide elective treatment to NHS patients.

The Centre Hospitalier de Calais is prepared to take on NHS patients for elective treatment from and its website says it is “part of the UK NHS system”.

The Calais hospital. built in 2012, has state of the art equipment, no waiting list and patients can be seen within weeks.

The hospital has even installed English signage, designed part of its website in English and trained doctors and nurses in English medical terminology.

On its website the hospital says;

“Just five minutes from the Eurotunnel and ferry terminals, Calais Hospital opened in 2012 and offers state-of-the-art facilities to rival the best private healthcare provision in east Kent”.

Rob Hustwayte, the commissioning groups’ spokesman, says patients have a right to choose where they receive NHS treatment. He said;

“We would encourage local people to consider the options of using hospitals in France and England when discussing treatment with their GP”.

Despite the promise of state-of-the-art facilities and no waiting lists the French hospital says it has only received two referrals – one last year and one this year as many patients opt to wait for an appointment in their home country.

Continue Reading

Secondary Care

Northumbria trust urges people to talk about organ donation

James M

Published

on

By

Northumbria trust urges people to talk about organ donation

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust is encouraging people to talk to their families about organ donation as part of their end of life care wishes.

To mark Organ Donation Week which runs until Sunday 10 September, the trust is urging people to tell their families they want to become donors to ensure more life-saving transplants can take place.

Figures released by NHS Blood and Transplant this week show 275 people in the North East have died waiting for an organ transplant over the past 10 years.

This means that hundreds of life-saving transplants are being missed every year because families do not know what their relative wanted. Left to make the decision for someone they love, families often decide it is safer to say no.

The reluctance to talk about the issue is contributing to a deadly shortage of organs. In the North East alone, there are currently 264 people waiting for a transplant. They will only receive that life-changing call if people make sure their families know they want to be a donor.

In 2016/17 the trust had the highest number of families consent to organ donation.

Tracey Carrott, Specialist Nurse in Organ Donation at NHS Blood and Transplant, said;

“To have 20 families consenting to organ donation last year is excellent and when you consider each donation has the potential to save up to nine lives – it brings home the scale of this. When you think that we had one family consenting to organ donation in 2010, it really does show how far we’ve come in the last seven years.

“Whereas nowadays many people are more aware of their relatives’ end of life care wishes, there are still many families who do not have that conversation and simply do not know what to do when that time comes.

“While we’ve made great strides in this area in recent years, we’re pleased to support this year’s Organ Donation Week and encourage people to make their family aware of their views.”

NHS Blood and Transplant surveys show more than 80% of people support organ donation but only around 49% of people have ever talked about it. Research shows that women are 30% more likely to start a conversation about organ donation than men.

Families who agree to donate say it helps with their grief and that they feel an enormous sense of pride at knowing their relative gave others the chance of a new beginning.

NHS Blood and Transplant wants everyone to be able to save lives through organ donation and not be prevented from doing so because they have not told a relative their decision.

For more information about organ donation, visit www.nhsbt.nhs.uk

Continue Reading

Trending