Anger as NHS staff accused of being ‘fat’

The government has government launched its new national obesity strategy in a bid to get the country’s health back in check.

James McKay
28 July 2020
specialist nurses

Nurses and ancillary staff have been accused of being “disproportionately tubby”.

An article in the Telegraph has today been met with widespread criticism and the author accused of “fat-shaming” nurses.

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Charles Moore, the newspapers former Editor and boss of Boris Johnson, took aim frontline workers in an opinion piece after the government launched its new national obesity strategy in a bid to get the country’s health back in check.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) yesterday unveiled a package of measures to help people lose weight and save the NHS millions a year.

Mr. Moore wrote; “Shortly after reading Matt Hancock’s article about combatting obesity in yesterday’s paper, I emerged from a café to find my way virtually blocked by an enormously wide, youngish woman in a nurse’s uniform.

“It was a vivid reminder of a general fact about the National Health Service: many of its staff are fat.”

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Tubby.

“If the public are being urged to lose weight, they will not take the message seriously if they notice that a substantial proportion of those caring for them are not doing so,” he said.

Before adding; “Sightings of fat NHS doctors are definitely unusual these days. Nurses and ancillary staff, on the other hand, are often disproportionately tubby.”

The article isn’t the first time critics have taken aim at healthcare staff, “expert hypnotist” Steve Miller has previously suggested that overweight NHS staff should carry a ‘I’m fat, but I’m losing it’ badge.

NHS staff took to social media condemning Mr. Moore’s comments, one person told TLE; “Do you know how hard it is for overworked people, like nurses, in highly stressful jobs to live a healthy lifestyle when they often have to work through their breaks?”

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Another suggested that working long days and frequent night shifts contributed to poor eating habits.

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