No snow day for dedicated NHS workers

They have been hailed as “Snow Heroes” on social media for going the extra mile to ensure that the NHS stays running.

Matt Bodell
4 February 2019
Day view parked cars under heavy snow

Dedicated NHS staff battled with the treacherous elements and low temperatures to ensure patients continue to get the care they need.

NHS staff spent last week walking miles in snow, digging vehicles out of drifts and sleeping in hospitals to ensure patients continue to get the care they need.

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England’s leading doctor and nurse praised NHS staff across the country for going to ‘extraordinary lengths’ to ensure they are ‘there to care’ for patients in the face of snowy and icy conditions that have brought parts of the country to a standstill.

Doctors, nurses, paramedics and care workers have all battled with the treacherous elements and low temperatures to ensure patients continue to get the care they need. Nurses and midwives have even slept in hospitals overnight.

They have been hailed as “Snow Heroes” on social media for going the extra mile to ensure that the NHS stays running.

Ruth May, the chief nursing officer for England, said “The dedication of nurses, midwives, ambulance workers, doctors and all health and care staff is something that we should really be proud of, all of whom regularly go above and beyond to ensure patients get the care and treatment they need whatever the weather.”

England’s national medical director, Professor Stephen Powis, said: “It is extraordinary to see the lengths that dedicated NHS staff are going to in order to ensure that people get the care they need.

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“I want to send a huge thank you to all the staff and volunteers who have dug out ambulances from the snow, slept over in hospitals to make sure they are there to care for patients in the morning, and braved the wintery conditions to get to work.

“The cold weather does bring health risks, particularly for older people and vulnerable with long term conditions. So the message to them from NHS staff is clear: help us help you, by taking steps to keep warm and well, checking in on vulnerable neighbours and relatives, and using the NHS 111 service as the first port of call for advice on symptoms and where to go for the right kind of help.”

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