Families of frontline health and care workers who die from COVID-19 will receive £60,000

The life assurance scheme was announced during the COVID-19 daily briefing earlier today. 

Matt Bodell
27 April 2020
Matt Hancock

The government is also looking at helping other frontline professions that do not have access to life assurance schemes.

The families of frontline health and social care staff who die from COVID-19 will receive a £60,000 payment, the Government has today announced.

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The life assurance scheme was announced during the COVID-19 daily briefing earlier today after over 100 health and social care professionals have died. 

Matt Hancock said; “Families of staff who die from coronavirus in the course of their essential frontline work will receive a £60,000 payment.

“Of course, nothing replaces the loss of a loved one but we want to do everything we can to support families who are dealing with this grief,” he added.

The announcement did not make clear which staff will be eligible for the life assurance scheme or if it has any exclusion criteria.

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Following the announcement, the health secretary also said the government was also looking at helping other frontline professions that do not have access to life assurance schemes. He said: “We are also looking at which other groups of key workers that applies to who don’t have a scheme already in place.”

The Royal College of Nursing has said it welcomes the news but has skeptically said it needs to “examine the details closely”.

Donna Kinnair, Chief Executive and General Secretary of the Royal College of Nursing said: “On the eve of the silence to remember those who paid the highest price, this announcement will bring reassurance to families in difficult situations.

“No amount of cash can make up for a family member who passes away but financial security should never add to the worries of those in grief.

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“The RCN and other health unions fought for this government announcement and we will examine the detail closely. It must be easily accessed, open to those in social care and primary care too and be paid promptly – no family should face a lengthy or complex process.”

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