Connect with us

Workforce

NHS Staff set to be banned from ‘extra’ Agency Work

Published

on

NHS trusts will soon be prevented from engaging agency staff for additional shifts if they are already employed as substantive staff within the NHS elsewhere.

According to the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC) Jim Mackey, Chief Executive of NHS Improvement, wrote to all trust Chief Executives on 27th February 2017 outlining the new rules to be brought in concerning the supply of agency staff to the NHS from the 1st of April 2017 (1).

While no information about the changes have been released publicly some trusts have started contacting employees advising them of the changes.

NHS Staff are using agency work as a way of supplementing their income through this period of ongoing pay restraint.

The news comes only months after the announcement that NHS Professionals is seeking “private” investment.

NHSI have confirmed to REC that all staff will be covered by these new rules, including medical locums and agency nurses.

This letter, leaked from the Ipswich Hospital NHS Trusts, outlines the proposed changes coming into effect on the 1st of April 2017.

The step has been heavily criticised as another way of alienating agency nurses following the changed to IR35 rules which come into force on the same day.

The new rules will not prevent NHS staff from undertaking agency work with private organisations, working overtime or working for a trusts internal bank. NHS Professionals is also unlikely to be effected. 

An RCN spokesperson, said: “We do not support this agency cap and we were not consulted. We support the right of our members to work in whatever way is best for them and their families.

“They added: “There is no obligation on nurses to join a hospital bank. It is the employer’s responsibility to ensure that shifts are filled. It is not right that nurses should work for less than they are worth.

“We will be taking this matter up further with NHS Improvement and the Department of Health.”

We have approached The Department of Health, and NHSI.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Join the discussion...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Workforce

RCN says the NHS is Supplementing Nurses with Unregistered Staff

Published

on

By

The Royal College of Nursing says that 90% of England’s largest NHS Hospitals are short of Nursing staff and supplementing them with unregistered staff.

The analysis of data on the NHS Choices website by the Royal College of Nursing had confirmed that a large proportion of NHS hospitals are short of Nurses.

The RCN says the data demonstrates that NHS hospitals are supplementing Registered Nurses by putting more unregistered staff on shift. They explain that with the situation is worse at night when two-thirds of the largest hospital trusts put more health care assistants on the wards than planned.

These findings support the RCN’s recent research highlighting 40,000 nurse vacancies across the NHS in England despite NHS Digital only having adverts for 11,500 vacancies.

Janet Davies, RCN Chief Executive, said the findings showed patients were being put at risk and called on the Government to increase the number of nurses.

“These startling figures show that, despite the Government’s rhetoric, our largest hospitals still do not have enough nurses and that is putting patients at risk.

“In light of this, the Government must redouble its efforts to train and recruit more qualified nurses and stop haemorrhaging the experienced ones who are fed up, undervalued and burning out fast.”

Janet went on to add it is unreasonable to expect unregistered staff to fill staffing gaps.

“It is unfair on the healthcare assistants too – they should not be left in a situation they have not been trained to handle.

“Nurses have degrees and expert training and, to be blunt, the evidence shows patients stand a better chance of survival and recovery when there are more of them on the ward.

The RCN has, once again, reiterated the need for safe staffing legislation to be brought into force in England – who have fallen behind both Scotland and Wales.

Continue Reading

Workforce

‘Thousands’ of funded training places for Student Nurses & Midwives announced

Published

on

By

The Government has announced ‘up-to’ 10,000 extra funded places for student nurses, midwives and allied health professionals in England by 2020.

The Department of Health says that it plans to reinvest some of the annual £1.2bn it will save after removing bursaries from student nurses, midwives and allied healthcare professionals back into training new healthcare professionals.

This news comes only a week after the official end to the NHS Bursary system in England.

‘Extra’ university places will be available for a range of healthcare roles including; nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy and occupational therapy. The actual number of places will be officially revealed next week when universities begin to fill empty spaces on their courses through their clearing process.

Health Education England (HEE) has previously claimed it received no extra money to fund more clinical placements in the 2017-18 academic year but changes to the way educational placements work could be to blame.

Janet Davies, RCN Chief Executive and General Secretary, said:

“There just aren’t enough nurses in training to fill the thousands of vacant posts, and the removal of student nurse funding is only driving down applications further. Meanwhile, the pay cap is forcing many nurses out of the profession they love”.

Many claim the move is part of a bigger plan to create more ‘homegrown’ nurses as the government fails to reassure nurses from the EU that they will be welcome post-brexit.

Continue Reading

Trending