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NMC Revalidation celebrates its first anniversary

Nursing Notes

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Nursing and Midwifery Council Revalidation was successfully launched a year ago in April 2016 and they say the feedback has been ‘overwhelmingly positive’.

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Since then more than 200,000 nurses and midwives have successfully revalidated, demonstrating that they can deliver care in a safe, effective and professional way.

According to to the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, with nurses and midwives saying that it is simple, straight-forward and beneficial to their practice.

The NMC continue to update our resources and guidance, taking into account feedback from those who have revalidated and their employers. No change has been made to the model of revalidation.

How to revalidate with the NMC now includes examples of what will, and what will not, count towards a nurse or midwife’s practice hours requirements.

The latest update to the forms and guidance also clarifies that continuing professional development (CPD) is separate and different from everyday learning and we have published guidance on CPD activities as a stand-alone document.

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NMC says regulation for nursing associates moves a step closer

James M

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The Nursing and Midwifery Council say regulation for nursing associates is getting closer and is expected by July 2018.

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The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has welcomed the Department of Health’s consultation on proposed changes to its legislation to enable the regulation of nursing associates.

The consultation follows the decision of the NMC’s Council to agree to regulate the new role, following a request from the Secretary of State for Health in January 2017.

Earlier this month the NMC released it’s draft standards of proficiency for Nursing Associates.

Jackie Smith, NMC Chief Executive and Registrar, said:

“This consultation is a vital step towards the NMC becoming the regulator of nursing associates.

“It’s always been our ambition to open the register to nursing associates in January 2019, when the first trainees qualify. But in order to do so, it’s critical that Government drives through the necessary changes to our legislation, to ensure that we’re able to protect the public from the moment the first qualified nursing associates begin to practise.”

The NMC expects the necessary changes to its legislation to come into force by July 2018. This will give the regulator six months until the first trainees qualify to complete the activities that need to be in place in order to open the register. This includes approving the NMC’s Rules and fees, approval of the final nursing associate standards and approval of nursing associates programme providers.

The consultation, Regulation of Nursing Associates in England, will run from 16 October to 26 December.

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NMC makes significant changes to language requirements for international nurses

Sarah J

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The Nursing and Midwifery Council have made significant changes to its English language requirements after claims the previous test was ‘too hard’.

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The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has today announced that it is making alternative options available for nurses and midwives, trained outside the UK, to demonstrate their English language capability.

From 1 November 2017, the NMC will accept the Occupational English Test (OET) in addition to the International English Language Test System (IELTS), as proof of a nurse or midwife’s English language competence.

This change will provide an alternative way for nurses and midwives to demonstrate their English language capability.

The NMC had previously investigated if the IELTS was too difficult with experts warning it was the primary reason for a reduction in the number of EU nurses.

Jackie Smith, NMC Chief Executive and Registrar, said:

“Nurses and midwives trained outside the UK make up around 15 percent of our register. They are vital to the delivery of health and care services across the UK.

“By accepting alternative forms of evidence we are increasing the options available for nurses and midwives to demonstrate they have the necessary command of English to practise safely and effectively, without compromising patient safety.”

The regulatory body says these changes are part of an ongoing review process into its English language requirements.

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