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Nurses break rules to grant dying man’s wish

Sarah J

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Nurses break rules to grant dying man’s wish

Nurses in Denmark broke all the Hospital rules to grant a dying man his last wish – wine and a cigarette.

Carsten Flemming Hansen was admitted to Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark last week where it was discovered he had internal bleeding and was unwell for surgery.

It was determined the 75-year-old man would never leave the hospital alive.

Hansen asked his nurse, Rikke Kvist, if she could help fulfil his dying wish of a last cigarette and a glass of wine.

“That was when I remembered that we are on the same floor that has access to a balcony,” Kvist said.

While the hospital does not allow smoking, the staff chose to bend the rules. Hansen was wheeled out to a balcony where he was joined by his family to enjoy a final sunset with a glass of wine and his last cigarette.

“It was a very cozy and relaxed atmosphere,” Kvist said. “Of course, they were relatives also affected by the fact that he was going to die, and they were sad.

“But it was cozy and there was humour.”

The hospital posted a photo of the man as he gazed out onto the town of Aarhus and it has gone viral, being liked over 72,000 times and shared almost 5,000 times.

Hansen’s daughter commented on the pic, thanking people for their support.

“This is my dear father who is in the beautiful picture,” Mette Guldbech Demuth wrote. “Many, many thanks for all the nice comments from you — the warms(sic) more than you expect.”

Do you think Nurses were right to bend the rules?

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Primary Care

Morning after pill can now be bought online for £4.99

Sarah J

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Morning after pill can now be bought online for £4.99

Online pharmacy Chemist 4 U has revealed they will be selling the morning after pill to women for just £4.99 per pack.

Initially, the online-only pharmacy was praised for making the morning after pill more accessible for women at an affordable price but some have criticised the move.

Women will be able to buy as many as three packs of Levonelle, a generic version of the pill, from the online pharmacy in six months.

Campaigners on reproductive ethics have been quick to condemn the initiative, explaining that the accessibility presents the morning-after pill as regular contraception, when professional advice is to only use it in emergencies.

Shamir Patel, Managing Director of Chemist 4 U, told The Independent;

“We always advise women in an emergency situation, to go to their nearest pharmacy that day, rather than waiting a day to receive it from an online pharmacy.

“However our belief is, an advanced supply from us avoids the panic in the unlikely event of barrier method failure. We advise all patients that EHC should not be used as a regular contraceptive method”.

Other retailers such as Boots and Superdrug have recently drastically reduced the cost of the morning after pill following calls from the British Pregnancy Advisory Service.

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May set to end public sector pay cap

Sarah J

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May set to end public sector pay cap

Reports indicate that Theresa May and Phillip Hammond are drawing up plans to remove the public sector pay cap.

Experts say that Theresa May is drawing up plans to end the seven-year cap on public sector pay, which currently restricts annual public sector pay increases to 1 per cent. It is thought mounting from public sector unions and finally contributed towards this change in policy.

Despite voting against the removal of the pay cap earlier this year, several senior ministers, including Boris Johnson Michael Fallon are in reportedly in support of dropping the unpopular policy.

The announcement is expected to take place when Liz Truss, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, sends guidance letters to the pay review bodies, including the NHSPRB, later this month.

Removal of the pay cap for all 5 million public sector employees would cost an estimated £4 billion a year.

A Downing Street spokesperson said;

“We are listening.

“We know that many people in the public and private sector feel they are just about managing.”

Many claim removal of the pay cap will help with staff shortages in certain areas, such as nursing, teaching and the senior civil service.

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