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Off-duty Nurses offer to help in wake of Manchester bombing

Ian Snug

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Hundreds of off-duty Nurses and Doctors have offered to help at Manchester’s Hospitals following last nights bombings.

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Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CMFT) and the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) have been inundated with offers of assistance from off-duty Nurses and Doctors.

Hundreds of healthcare professionals, wanting to help in anyway possible, posted on social media offering their assistance to Manchester’s hospitals and emergency services. Off-duty Doctors and Nurses at the hospital arrived after hearing the news online.

Latest reports say that 22 have been killed and many more are receiving life saving treatment.

The chief executive or North West Ambulance Service, Derek Cartwright said; “No matter how much we train our staff for incidents such as this, nothing can prepare you for the shock and sadness when tragedies like this occur”.

“We would like to convey our thanks to our colleagues in West Midlands, Wales, Yorkshire and East Midlands ambulance services who provided mutual aid so we could continue reaching patients who needed our help in our communities”.

“We had many messages throughout the night from people volunteering their services, blankets, first aid skills and tea. It was extremely heart-warming to receive such messages and demonstrates how a city can pull together during these difficult times”.

Anyone who is concerned about loved ones who may have been in the area around the Manchester Arena last night should contact Greater Manchester Police on 0161 856 9400.

We have approached Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CMFT) for comment. 

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Primary Care

NHS trusts pressuring staff to help meet vaccination targets

Sarah J

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Front-line staff are reporting that NHS trusts are pressuring staff into receiving the influenza vaccine in order to achieve governmental targets.

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Front-line NHS staff claim they are getting ever-increasing pressure to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine as cash-strapped NHS trusts strive to hit the ‘Flu Fighter’ CQUIN, which provides significant financial incentives for trusts who vaccinate a proportion of their staff.

This news follows last weeks announcement that NHS England will write to all healthcare workers reminding them of their “professional duty” to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine.

One member of staff, who wishes to remain anonymous, claims she was forced to sign a ‘Declination of Influenza Vaccine‘ document by their NHS Trust which states refusal of the vaccine may have ‘life-threatening’ consequences and asks for the reason for refusal.

A spokesperson for NursingNotes said;

“While receiving the vaccine is an important part of infection control, like any patient, staff must provide informed consent and have a right to refuse the vaccination”.

A spokesperson for the RCN said:

“We encourage all nursing staff to have the vaccine. It plays an important part in infection control and preventing sickness absence”.

The NHS Employers ‘Flu Fighter’ campaign is part of an initiative to improve the health and wellbeing of NHS employees.

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Patients could be banned from A&E unless a healthcare professional refers them

Ian Snug

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The “talk before you walk” scheme could see patients barred from using A&E without first seeking healthcare advice elsewhere.

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Under “talk before you walk” proposals, patients would need to gain approval from either their GP or the NHS 111 advice line before self-presenting to an accident and emergency department and could be turned away without this.

The scheme is intended to improve compliance of the 4-hour target by sign-posting patients to more appropriate services.

The news comes as health services prepare, for what many experts claim will be, the “worst winter on record” for emergency care services.

Dr Helen Thomas, National Medical Advisor for Integrated Urgent Care at NHS England, said:

“Jeremy Hunt has mentioned to some of my colleagues, maybe we should have a ‘talk before you walk’ and we may well pilot that.

“I think it’s been done in other countries where they’ve actually said you can’t come to the emergency department until you’ve talked on referral or you have to have that sort of docket that you’re given by having talked down the phone and being told you should come in.”

But the British Medical Association (BMA) said forcing ill patients to go through an extra layer of bureaucracy would cause further delays and could compromise emergency care pathways.

A spokesman for NHS England said there were no current plans to go ahead with the scheme.

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